Barrel Seasoning?

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Gatmandu
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Barrel Seasoning?

Postby Gatmandu » Sat Dec 24, 2016 10:21 pm

Hi Folks,

I just completed a Ruger 10/22 build. My goal is to end up with a accurate, long distance, .22 rifle. The only part that is still 'Ruger' is the receiver.

I have a Volquartsen, fluted stainless barrel on it. The recommended break-in procedure seems a bit extreme me, but maybe not. It states fire 5 rounds through it and then clean the barrel. "Repeat for 30 shots". OK....that 6 times I need to clean it. Then fire 10 rounds through it and clean the barrel. "Repeat for 70 shots: OK.....that is 7 more times I need to clean the barrel.

Now after spending what I consider a few bucks for this barrel I will do what is recommended, but is this really necessary?

Your thoughts please.......

Don
I know nothing.......

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Bullseye
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Re: Barrel Seasoning?

Postby Bullseye » Sun Dec 25, 2016 8:06 am

Forging a new stainless barrel can leave slight tooling marks inside which can cause minor lead build-up when fired. The idea behind all the cleanings is to clean out those minor mineral deposits before they become major ones. .22 is a relatively soft lead nosed bullet and because it is not jacketed ammo there are more frequent cleanings required if you want to "season", or "break-in", a new barrel for a high degree of accuracy. After the appropriate amount of shots, friction will smooth out those rough spots and the frequency of needed cleanings will decrease significantly. Another benefit of the short amount of shots before cleaning is also to allow the barrel to heat and completely cool causing expansion and contraction between firings allowing the barrel to settle into its natural harmonic patterns. The manufacturer is just publishing a general set of break-in tolerances based on the average match barrel they sell. Now that you've invested the cash, it's time to put in a little bit of work (call it a little sweat equity) to make your custom firearm perform to its fullest possible potential.

Hope this helps,

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Gatmandu
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Re: Barrel Seasoning?

Postby Gatmandu » Tue Dec 27, 2016 9:21 pm

Thanks Bullseye for your reply. At least now I have a better understanding why I'll endure this lengthy process.

Another question:

The manufacture's instructions also state "do not use a Teflon-based oil in the bore". How do I know what is NOT a Teflon-based oil? I guess the question is what oil do I use? Any suggestions?

Don
I know nothing.......

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Bullseye
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Re: Barrel Seasoning?

Postby Bullseye » Wed Dec 28, 2016 4:54 pm

First off you really don't want to shoot your barrel with any oil, or lubricants in it. Oils are just used for storage to protect the barrel from corrosion. I usually run a clean dry patch down the barrel before any shooting begins.

Lots of today's gun lubricants have small amounts Teflon (or PTFE) in them, anything that says "CLP" will likely contain some teflon. The best way to ensure you're not using Teflon lubes in your barrel is to check the product's ingredients listing or obtain a "MSDS" sheet for it. You can use some plain old "Mobil 1" synthetic oil in your barrel for preservation during storage. Just remember to wipe it out with a clean patch prior to use.

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